nov 302019
 

I tidsskriftet jeg leser aller grundigst (og som jeg har lest hvert nummer av siden våren 1981), First Things, skriver redaktør R.R. Reno i siste nummer (Desember 2019) i sin faste spalte The Public Square (et stykke ned på siden) om sitt møte med den tradisjonelle latinske messen, som han begynte å gå til sommeren 2018. Her er en hel del av hans tanker om dette:

Et Cum Spiritu Tuo

I don’t know more than a few Latin words and ­phrases. A former Episcopalian, I take for granted the liturgy in the vernacular. I’ve never been punctilious about ritual. I can’t tell you the difference between the “Introit” and the “Gradual.” … … In spite of all that, I’ve been attending a Latin Mass in Manhattan for more than a year.

My initial reasons for switching to the Tridentine rite had to do with the revelations about Theodore McCarrick in the summer of 2018. I was angry, exasperated by the feckless leadership of bishops and their tolerance of moral corruption in their own ranks. But anger, however righteous and fitting in the moment, can turn into bitterness, even despair, corroding faith and undermining the spiritual life. So I knew I had to find an affirmative way to express my disgust with the status quo in the Catholic Church.

Under these circumstances, I turned to the Latin Mass. In church parlance, it is called the Extraordinary Form, as opposed to the order of the Mass established after Vatican II by Paul VI, which is called the Ordinary Form. These terms are exactly right. The Ordinary Form is the almost universal mode of worship for American Catholics, while the Extraordinary Form marks the exception. Thus, my decision to make the Tridentine rite my regular Sunday Mass was a vote of no confidence in the status quo, but not one that pushed the Church away. Going to the Extraordinary Form was a way of drawing nearer, entering into the great storehouse of the Catholic tradition.

There are Mass booklets for the Extraordinary Form that allow you to follow along with a facing-page translation. Even with this aid, it takes time to get oriented. ….

From the outset I was romanced by the long silences. The Tridentine rite emphasizes the priest as mediator. He faces the altar, not the congregation, and he speaks many parts of the Mass in a whisper. His words are directed, on our behalf, toward God, not toward us. This dynamic of prayer (a dialogue between priest as representative and God) affects the worshiper in subtle ways. It encourages each individual member of the congregation to enter into his own silent conversation with the divine. This is especially true during the consecration of the elements.

…. ….

Many priests are suspicious of the Latin Mass. Some are hostile. These responses are understandable. Going to the Latin Mass requires me to decide against attending the Ordinary Form, which is of course widely available throughout New York. And because the priestly vocation comes into its most intense focus in the sacrifice of the Mass, this decision can easily be seen casting doubt on the education and formation of priests over the last fifty years.

But my experiences with the Extraordinary Form have been otherwise. The more familiar I have become with the old rite, the more I see and feel the profound continuities with the new one. The elements of the Mass are the same in both. Furthermore, my experience with the Tridentine Mass allows me to appreciate the intentions of the liturgical reformers of the twentieth century. The old rite is colder and less immediately communal. It presumes a well-catechized congregation. By contrast, the use of the vernacular, the more fulsome lectionary, and the clear articulation by the priest of all the elements of the liturgy make the Ordinary Form more effective as a means for inculcating into the faithful the basic teachings of the Church about the nature of God and the role of Christ as the sacrament of our salvation. And not just the faithful. The Extraordinary Form has an other-worldly allure that might attract unbelievers, but both the Latin language and the ritual remoteness of the rite make it difficult to hear the gospel message. By contrast, the Ordinary Form makes the gospel audible.

At the same time, by attending the Extraordinary Form on a regular basis I have learned more about what has been lost. In the Latin Mass, the priest risks tending toward the caricature of remote hierophant engaged in mysterious rites at a distant altar. In the Ordinary Form, he risks tending toward the caricature of mediocre TV host chatting with his daytime audience of distracted housewives. If forced to choose between the two perversions, I vastly prefer the former.

…. ….

Benedict XVI observed that the Extraordinary and Ordinary Forms are two usages of the ­self-same Roman rite. This does not mean that they do not have distinct charisms, as it were. The Ordinary Form is well suited for evangelization and catechism. My own entry into the Catholic Church was greatly eased by the accessibility of the Mass in the vernacular. Its more horizontal orientation encourages a sense of Christian community, as the liturgical reformers intended. The reduced emphasis on ritual precision shifts attention to the central gospel truths announced in the readings and reiterated in a liturgy readily heard in the language of the people. All these elements enrich the ­Catholic Church.

The charism of the Extraordinary Form is needed as well. At a time when all the institutions of the West, ­including the Church, are wobbling, the antiquity of the Tridentine Mass anchors corporate worship deep in the Church’s past. The remoteness of Latin, a “dead” language, builds a spiritual wall around the Church that helps protect her from capture by the whims and fashions of the contemporary world. The vestments, incense, and ritual create another world, in which it becomes easy to see oneself entering into the precincts of the divine, a prospect at once daunting and joyful. Centuries of use have tuned the Latin Mass to a near perfect pitch. In its more elaborate forms, the orchestrated layers of music, movement, and prayer interweave into a liturgical ­Gesamtkunstwerk, which is why, although the Mass I now attend is thirty minutes longer than the Ordinary Form liturgy, it seems shorter.

I have not become an ardent proponent of the Extraordinary Form. It has limitations, which is why it was reformed in the last century. But I have come to think the Latin Mass can make a contribution to the Church’s renewal. In the twentieth century, influential theologians called for ressourcement, a return to the sources of our Christian faith. We need always to soak ourselves in the living water of the tradition. The Tridentine rite offers an opportunity for ressourcement. This is not an opportunity to be shunned, because Ordinary Form, too, has it limitations, as most of us know only too well. Those limitations are to be expected. We are only at the first stage of what will be an ongoing refinement and perfection of the Mass in the vernacular. And this process, so needed in order to realize the full promise of what was begun at Vatican II, can be enhanced by the example and inspiration of the Extraordinary Form.

nov 262019
 

gloria.tv (og på katholisches.info) kan vi lese at biskop Precioso D. Cantillas, SDB, i bispedømmet Maasin på Filippinene nylig har skrevet et brev med overskrift “Turning to God (“Ad Orientem, ad Deum”)” og der skriver han bl.a.:

As we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King this year today, November 24, 2019, let us pledge once again, as His People, the Diocese Maasim, to turn more ardently and devotedly to God, who sent JESUS, His only-begotten Son, Our King and our Saviour. One of the particular ways to express concretely our turning to God is in the celebration of the Liturgy.

We remind ourselves of a very important understanding of the Liturgy as explained by Cardinal Sarah, the Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments, “God, not man is at the center of Catholic liturgy. We come to worship Him. The liturgy is not about you and I, it is not where we celebrate our own identity or achievements or exalt or promote our own culture and local religious customs. ….

…. The Cardinal, in his address on the “authentic implementation” of the Vatican II Document on the Liturgy, “invited all priests to celebrate the Mass ad orientem … and that it is very important that we return as soon as possible to a common orientation, of priests and the faithful turned together in the same direction – Eastwards or at least towards the apse – to the Lord who comes, in those parts of the liturgical rites when we are addressing God. This practice is permitted by current liturgical legislation. It is perfectly legitimate in the modern rite. Indeed, I think it is a very important step in ensuring that in our celebrations the Lord is truly at the center.”

Therefore, beginning this new Liturgical Year, the First Sunday of Advent, December 1, 2019, the celebration of Mass “ad orientem” will start in the Diocese of Maasin. The Celebrant and the Faithful will face or turn together in the same direction to the Lord, represented in the Altar and the Crucifix, in those parts of the liturgical rites when we are addressing God. …

We hope that introducing this way of worshipping God in the Liturgy, we become “fellow worshippers united in the one same act of adoration.” The Clergy (Bishop, Priests and Deacons) and the Lay prayer-Leaders will lead the Faithful towards the Lord and not be at the center of liturgical worship themselves. …

katholisches.info tar også med bildet under, som de kaller “eine Karikatur zur Veranschaulichung der beiden Zelebrationsrichtungen”.

nov 252019
 

Fredag 29. november kl 18.00 feirer jeg den tradisjonelle latinske messen i Vår Frue kirke i Porsgrunn. Denne dagen er det messen for 24. og siste søndag etter pinse som feires, og den hellige Saturnin skal også minnes.

Messens inngangsvers er:

Dicit Dóminus: Ego, cógito cogitatiónes pacis, et non afflictiónis: invocábitis me, et ego exáudiam vos: et redúcam captivitátem vestram de cunctis locis. Benedixísti, Dómine,terram tuam: avertísti captivitátem Jacob. Gloria Patri …. Dicit Dóminus….. – Herren sier: Jeg tenker tanker til fred og ikke til ulykke; dere skal rope til meg, og jeg skal bønnhøre dere, og jeg skal føre fangene deres tilbake fra alle steder. Du har signet ditt land, Herre, du har vendt fangenskapet fra Jakob. Ære være ……

Kollektbønnen er:

Excita, quæsumus Dómine, tuórum fidélium voluntátes, ut dívini óperis fructum propénsius exsequéntes, pietátis tuæ remédia majóra percípiant. Per Dóminum nostrum ….. — Vi ber deg, Herre: Vekk dine troendes hjerter, så de ved dypere å tilegne seg frukten av det guddommelige verk, nådig kan oppnå større midler til frelse. Ved vår Herre …

Man finner alle bønnene og tekstene for 24. søndag etter pinse HER.

Det finnes flere hellige Saturnin, men han som minnes er Den hellige Saturnin av Toulouse (d. ~250?), og om ham kan man lese ganske mye HER.

nov 162019
 

Som en del av møtet til Liturgikommisjonen for noe dager siden besøkte vi Vatikanets Gudstjeneste- og sakramentskongregasjon. Under kan man se noen bilder fra møtet (bildene er tatt av Sigurd Hareide, foran med skjerf i første bilde).